Sabrina Fatma Ahmad

The heart will lead you back

Originally from Massachusetts, international development consultant Elizabeth Shick was living with her family in Yangon, Myanmar from 2013-2019 and got to witness not just Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy win the 2015 elections by a landslide, but the military crackdown on Rakhine state that led to the Rohingya exodus into Bangladesh in 2017.

2w ago

Learning to let go

As the novel progresses, you peel back layers of history between Claire and her grandparents and realise that the Korea issue isn’t as straightforward as our protagonist imagined.

What you call your own

As an Anglophone writer in Bangladesh, I’ve frequently faced the rather inane question of why I write in English.

Mood mirror

Whenever depression is depicted in pop culture, it is shown in some visible extreme, with blue-grey lighting, dark rooms, ashen faces peering out through rainy windows, bodies curled up in bed.

Why so serious?

Falling into the comfortable rhythm of a familiar form, it took scant minutes to bang out a silly poem that made me laugh and melted away all the tension, and it took me back to why I created Sehri Tales in the first place.

The magic of muscle memory

While talent might determine the quality of the writing, and many of our Talers have these in buckets, the basic skill is actually a result of something more mundane: consistent practice.

Homegrown heroine

This story, which originally began as a short story, features a headstrong heroine putting her desires above what society expects of her, in order to realise her destiny.

In defense of brevity

You’ve got a fantastic project, and have found a potential investor for this. They’ve given you two minutes to deliver a killer pitch and convince them you’re worth it.

February 1, 2024
February 1, 2024

The heart will lead you back

Originally from Massachusetts, international development consultant Elizabeth Shick was living with her family in Yangon, Myanmar from 2013-2019 and got to witness not just Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy win the 2015 elections by a landslide, but the military crackdown on Rakhine state that led to the Rohingya exodus into Bangladesh in 2017.

December 28, 2023
December 28, 2023

Learning to let go

As the novel progresses, you peel back layers of history between Claire and her grandparents and realise that the Korea issue isn’t as straightforward as our protagonist imagined.

September 28, 2023
September 28, 2023

What you call your own

As an Anglophone writer in Bangladesh, I’ve frequently faced the rather inane question of why I write in English.

August 31, 2023
August 31, 2023

Mood mirror

Whenever depression is depicted in pop culture, it is shown in some visible extreme, with blue-grey lighting, dark rooms, ashen faces peering out through rainy windows, bodies curled up in bed.

April 15, 2023
April 15, 2023

Why so serious?

Falling into the comfortable rhythm of a familiar form, it took scant minutes to bang out a silly poem that made me laugh and melted away all the tension, and it took me back to why I created Sehri Tales in the first place.

April 8, 2023
April 8, 2023

The magic of muscle memory

While talent might determine the quality of the writing, and many of our Talers have these in buckets, the basic skill is actually a result of something more mundane: consistent practice.

April 6, 2023
April 6, 2023

Homegrown heroine

This story, which originally began as a short story, features a headstrong heroine putting her desires above what society expects of her, in order to realise her destiny.

April 1, 2023
April 1, 2023

In defense of brevity

You’ve got a fantastic project, and have found a potential investor for this. They’ve given you two minutes to deliver a killer pitch and convince them you’re worth it.

March 25, 2023
March 25, 2023

Take note: How note-taking can come in handy when you’re short of inspiration

Watch this print space for the Talespeople's weekly reflections on creative writing.

January 26, 2023
January 26, 2023

Family of feelings: Iffat Nawaz's 'Shurjo's Clan'

Part memoir, part magical realism, this is a story about identity and the idea of home.

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