Shahriar Shaams

Shahriar Shaams has written for SUSPECT, Third Lane Mag (forthcoming), Commonwealth Writers’ Adda, Six Seasons Review, and Jamini. Find him on twitter @shahriarshaams.

Celebrating the best of Bengali short fiction

Bengali literature has had a rich history of prose, beginning more or less in the early 19th century under the colonial Raj.

1w ago

Unseen chains of consequences

When a few boys arrive at the couple’s flat to seek out their college-going daughter, Rekha, the parents are thrown into a whirlwind of adventure.

3w ago

Hair cream

The mosque committee was quite displeased with Rashed, their young muezzin.

1m ago

Human passions in Kurosawa’s Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s enduring international appeal is in part due to the remarkable personalities he had invented.

1m ago

The Precious O

That split second when the rubber slaps your skin and stays, when there is a click of a switch, a levitation, a lightness of your body—everyone remembers the first time they are knocked out, everyone except Mr Suleyman Khar, regional light-heavyweight titleist,

2m ago

Meditations on sanity in ‘Hospital’

Though on its surface Sanya Rushdi’s  Hospital, translated into English by Arunava Sinha and recently longlisted for the 2024 Stella Prize, looks to be a breezy, short read—it is anything but. With her rather flattened, sparse prose, Rushdi has managed to write an enduring piece of autofiction, a compelling account of psychosis that neither sensationalises nor withers away any sentimentality from the struggles of mental health.

3m ago

The enchanting realism in Shahaduz Zaman’s ‘The Mynah Bird’s Testimony’

Shahaduz Zaman is a familiar face in Bangladeshi literature, whose literary career spans decades of fruitful work. He regularly writes columns for Bangla newspapers, has written a few notable biographical fiction, such as Ekjon Komolalebu (Prothoma, 2017), based around the life of Jibanananda Das, and has garnered some duly needed appreciation for ethnographic work on the history of medicine during the liberation war.

4m ago

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Italian renovations

Jhumpa Lahiri has always been the rare author whose prowess in the art of the short-story far surpassed her novelistic talents.

5m ago
June 13, 2024
June 13, 2024

Celebrating the best of Bengali short fiction

Bengali literature has had a rich history of prose, beginning more or less in the early 19th century under the colonial Raj.

May 29, 2024
May 29, 2024

Unseen chains of consequences

When a few boys arrive at the couple’s flat to seek out their college-going daughter, Rekha, the parents are thrown into a whirlwind of adventure.

May 18, 2024
May 18, 2024

Hair cream

The mosque committee was quite displeased with Rashed, their young muezzin.

May 4, 2024
May 4, 2024

Human passions in Kurosawa’s Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s enduring international appeal is in part due to the remarkable personalities he had invented.

April 20, 2024
April 20, 2024

The Precious O

That split second when the rubber slaps your skin and stays, when there is a click of a switch, a levitation, a lightness of your body—everyone remembers the first time they are knocked out, everyone except Mr Suleyman Khar, regional light-heavyweight titleist,

March 28, 2024
March 28, 2024

Meditations on sanity in ‘Hospital’

Though on its surface Sanya Rushdi’s  Hospital, translated into English by Arunava Sinha and recently longlisted for the 2024 Stella Prize, looks to be a breezy, short read—it is anything but. With her rather flattened, sparse prose, Rushdi has managed to write an enduring piece of autofiction, a compelling account of psychosis that neither sensationalises nor withers away any sentimentality from the struggles of mental health.

February 15, 2024
February 15, 2024

The enchanting realism in Shahaduz Zaman’s ‘The Mynah Bird’s Testimony’

Shahaduz Zaman is a familiar face in Bangladeshi literature, whose literary career spans decades of fruitful work. He regularly writes columns for Bangla newspapers, has written a few notable biographical fiction, such as Ekjon Komolalebu (Prothoma, 2017), based around the life of Jibanananda Das, and has garnered some duly needed appreciation for ethnographic work on the history of medicine during the liberation war.

January 4, 2024
January 4, 2024

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Italian renovations

Jhumpa Lahiri has always been the rare author whose prowess in the art of the short-story far surpassed her novelistic talents.

December 13, 2023
December 13, 2023

The futuristic post-punk world of Izumi Suzuki

More than anything, Suzuki shows that the key to being an alien is not to be outlandish but to be sickeningly more human.

November 23, 2023
November 23, 2023

Despair and death in ‘Truth or Dare’

Bangladeshi literature in English has had a considerably late start compared to its South Asian counterparts in India and Pakistan. A few exceptions aside, a consistency came to be seen only by the early 2010s.

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